Historic Upper Arlington

Entrance to Upper Arlington at Cambridge & Fifth Avenues in 1918. (Courtesy of UA Archives.)

Entrance to Upper Arlington at Cambridge & Fifth Avenues in 1918. (Courtesy of UA Archives.)

Our History

Upper Arlington was founded by brothers King and Ben Thompson, who purchased the original 840 acres from James T. Miller in 1913. Inspired by the Country Club development in Kansas City, the Thompsons envisioned an idealistic residential community for Columbus.

Sign at Miller Park. (Courtesy of Kristin Greenberg.)  

Sign at Miller Park. (Courtesy of Kristin Greenberg.)
 

Our Historical District

In October of 1985, the Upper Arlington Historic District was listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

Recording oral histories of UA residents.  

Recording oral histories of UA residents.
 

Preservation Projects

From recording oral histories for posterity to saving / restoring historical buildings, the Upper Arlington Historical Society is making sure the past is not forgotten.

Norwester magazine front cover, June 1918. (Courtesy of UA Archives.)

Norwester magazine front cover, June 1918. (Courtesy of UA Archives.)

DIY RESEARCH

The UA Archives website presents original documents, photographs, maps, and other media. Through the UA Archives, the Library cultivates ongoing partnerships with the Upper Arlington Historical Society, the City of Upper Arlington, the Upper Arlington City School District, community organizations, and individuals to digitize items of historical interest and make them available to the public.

Stone is a common building material in Upper Arlington.  

Stone is a common building material in Upper Arlington.
 

Historic districT Building GuideLines

The purpose of the Guidelines is to acquaint residents of the Upper Arlington Historic District with the heritage and responsibility that accompanies the privilege of living in an historic district. This information helps residents restore or preserve their homes to the original architecture or to renovate them sensitively.